Exploring the Intersection of Food, Culture and Identity

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American Food Roots

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Thank you for visiting The Hyphenated Chef. But from now on, please find me at my new location, American Food Roots, an online magazine dedicated to the proposition that all food derives from history and culture. Find us on Facebook! Follow us on Twitter at @AmerFoodRoots. We look forward to seeing you soon. All best, Michele

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December 20, 2012   Comments Off

Julia Child: More than just The French Chef

Elsa Dorfman/cropped by Damiens

Julia Child changed the way America cooks. But she also changed the way women thought of cooking — and themselves. As we approach what would have been Child’s 100th birthday, coming this August, Judith Jones says she revolutionized cookbooks, giving women credit for actually being able to cook.  Sara Moulton, Food Network host, calls her a role model for women everywhere. Please check out my story, by clicking on the link above.

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May 11, 2012   Comments Off

Party Like a Mad Man Virtual Dinner Party

Rod Sterling's Martini

So happy to have been asked to participate in the virtual dinner party for Judy Gelmans “The Unofficial Mad Men Cookbook.” More than just a companion book for a television show (check out my AP story on those), the cookbook is a fantastic work of culinary anthropology. Judy not only tracked down the history on dishes like “California Dip” — aka: Lipton onion soup and sour cream — but she also excavated original recipes from Sardis, the Grand Central Oyster Bar and other places that Don Draper and his mad mad men hang out.

I made three items for the party: Roger Sterling’s signature Martini (which I’m sipping right now, thank you very much), California Dip (who doesn’t need chips with a drink?), and Trudy’s Roast Chicken.

I confess I haven’t been a devoted Mad Men fan, but when I did catch an episode it usually involved Trudy and Pete and their struggle to have a baby. My husband and I also went though this, and we DID wind up adopting – from the very same town in India where my husband was born (shopping the memoir, Mango Season, even as we speak.) And even though things got really rough a few times, he never threw a chicken. Maybe a pen or a few harsh words. But never food. Then again, if this one isn’t cooked properly….

Trudy's Roast Chicken

I made the California dip because I actually REMEMBER it from my childhood. My mom is an inveterate snacker, and potato chips with onion dip is her vice. It was always in the house (note: my husband is lactose intolerant, so I subbed greek yogurt for sour cream. Worked like a charm.) But UTZ chips — the famed account of the ad agency — those I didn’t discover until I moved to DC.

California Dip+ UTZ chips!

I made the martini because…I don’t know. It’s Sunday? And I love martinis.

Going to go eat the whole shabang now! Come catch me and many other bloggers on Twitter at 8pm, hashtag #PartyLikeAMadMan

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March 18, 2012   4 Comments